Perfect Little World

Perfect Little World

When Isabelle Poole meets Dr. Preston Grind, she's just about out of options. She recently graduated from high school and is pregnant with her art teacher's baby. Her mother is dead and her father is a drunk. The art teacher is too much of a head-case to help raise the child. Izzy knows she can be a good mother but without any money or prospects, she's left searching.

So when Dr. Grind offers her a space in The Infinite Family Project, she accepts. Housed in a spacious compound in Tennessee, she joins nine other couples, all with children the same age as her newborn son, to raise their children as one extended family. Grind's theory is that the more parental love a child receives, the better off they are.

This attempt at a utopian ideal-funded by an eccentric billionaire-starts off promising: Izzy enjoys the kids, reading to them and teaching them to cook. She even forms a bond with her son more meaningful than she ever expected. But soon the gentle equilibrium among the families is upset and it all starts to disintegrate: unspoken resentments between the couples begin to fester; the project's funding becomes tenuous; and Izzy's feelings for Dr. Grind, who is looking to expunge his own painful childhood, make her question her participation in this strange experiment in the first place.

Written with the same compassionate voice, disarming sense of humor, and quirky charm that made The Family Fang such a success, Perfect Little World is a poignant look at how the best families are the ones we make for ourselves.

Title:Perfect Little World
Edition Language:English
ISBN:null
Format Type:

    Perfect Little World Reviews

  • karen

    this is the first book i have read by kevin wilson, although i own both of his others. i wasn't immediately wowed by the synopsis, but from its first sentence (the first chapter 1 sentence, after the ...

  • Diane S ?

    3.5 In this book, Kevin Wilson tackles another take on the family. Communal parenting, nine couples and one single young girl, Izzy, who has just graduated from high school and finds herself alone and...

  • da AL

    Wonderful premise -- great questions brought up regarding love, bonding, families - interesting characters - but all at the beginning. By the end of the book, I was disappointed. Also, why so much rei...

  • Book of the Month

    PARENTAL GUIDANCE SUGGESTEDBy Judge Maris KreizmanAt a time when dystopian novels are all the rage, what a delight to read a novel about striving for perfection, no matter how short the effort may fal...

  • Joshua Orf-Rodriguez

    A perfect little premise with a cursory, yet at times enjoyable, execution. I was excited about this book, a crazy experiment where 10 children are raised by 19 adults in a communal-like home. The boo...

  • Kara

    I think the problem with this book is that it just isn't weird enough. It needed to get weird. The first third or so is a fine piece of contemporary fiction. I liked the characters, I liked how they i...

  • Jennifer

    Great beginning and ending. Middle was slow and tedious in my opinion. Loved the themes in this book though.My favorite quote:“When the world fell apart around you, when the walls of your home crack...

  • Cricket

    This review comes in four parts.Part One: PacingThis is the shortest part. The pacing was bad. We're talking: take-half-the-book-to-set-up-the-premise bad. I'm assuming the author wanted to get us goo...

  • Alena

    I can't decide between 3 and 4, but it's Kevin Wilson so based on creativity alone I'll round up. I found the "it takes a village utopian background" of this book intriguing and the complexity of the ...

  • Savanna Couey 📚

    I really don’t even know where to begin with this book. I liked it...and then I didn’t, and then I did. It had a unique concept. A group of parents who take turns raising each other’s kids. Howe...