Beren and Lúthien

Beren and Lúthien

Restored from Tolkien’s manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and standalone story, the epic tale of Beren and Lúthien will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Humans, Dwarves and Orcs and the rich landscape and creatures unique to Tolkien’s Middle-earth. The tale of Beren and Lúthien was, or became, an essential element in the evolution of The Silmarillion, the myths and legends of the First Age of the World conceived by J.R.R. Tolkien. Returning from France and the battle of the Somme at the end of 1916, he wrote the tale in the following year.

Essential to the story, and never changed, is the fate that shadowed the love of Beren and Lúthien: for Beren was a mortal man, but Lúthien was an immortal Elf. Her father, a great Elvish lord, in deep opposition to Beren, imposed on him an impossible task that he must perform before he might wed Lúthien. This is the kernel of the legend; and it leads to the supremely heroic attempt of Beren and Lúthien together to rob the greatest of all evil beings, Melkor, called Morgoth, the Black Enemy, of a Silmaril.

In this book Christopher Tolkien has attempted to extract the story of Beren and Lúthien from the comprehensive work in which it was embedded; but that story was itself changing as it developed new associations within the larger history. To show something of the process whereby this legend of Middle-earth evolved over the years, he has told the story in his father's own words by giving, first, its original form, and then passages in prose and verse from later texts that illustrate the narrative as it changed. Presented together for the first time, they reveal aspects of the story, both in event and in narrative immediacy, that were afterwards lost.

Title:Beren and Lúthien
Edition Language:English
ISBN:null
Format Type:

    Beren and Lúthien Reviews

  • Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    Straight from the pages of The Silmarillion, this tale has been given new authority and the chance to stand on its own.And such a story it is. It’s about a mortal man who fell in love with an immort...

  • Petrik

    Unlike The Children of Hurin, unless you’re a lover of poetry or you're a diehard Tolkien fans, I doubt the overall content of this book will be enjoyable to read.The Children of Hurin has a novel f...

  • Adrian

    Hmm, a difficult job to review this book. I felt it was a cross between wonderful 5 star Tolkien storytelling and occasionally tough going almost repetitive storytelling, but the Tolkien verse and pro...

  • Michael Galdamez

    When I first saw this online:Then this happened:Now I am content.... Unless there are any more stories good ol' Christopher can pull together for us!...

  • Alexandra Elend Wolf

    3.5 stars "Three jewels he made, and names the Silmarils. A living fire burning within them that was blended of the light of the Two Trees." Beren and Lúthien is more than I was expecting. A ta...

  • Kevin Kuhn

    I have great admiration for JRR Tolkein, his imagination seems endless and his commitment to his craft was incredible. It's clear his son Christopher has a genuine love of his father's work and treats...

  • Jo (The Bookish pianist)

    I consider myself a huge Tolkien fan, and,the world we all know as Middle Earth, you could say, it is my second home. If one wished to go a step further, you could also day, that The Lord of the rings...

  • Markus

    "Then Beren took to following Tinúviel secretly through the woods even to the entrance of the cave and the bridge’s head, and when she was gone in he would cry across the stream, softly saying ‘T...

  • Bradley

    Okay, so, this book requires a HUGE caveat.It's uneven as hell, it's not a full tale, and it is comprised of many unfinished snippets in various states of revision. You can see thirty odd years worth ...

  • Kevin Futers

    Part of me wanted to go five stars, another part of me wanted to go to one. The disappointment is simple: with The Children of Hurin we were given a single narrative without break or comment. That is ...